Texas Scrutiny of Bite Mark Evidence

The New York Times reports today on the Texas Forensic Science Commission’s inquiry into the use of bite mark evidence in criminal cases – including review of old cases – and development of “guidelines on whether bite-mark comparisons should have any role in the courtroom.”  The Commission’s recommendations are expected in February 2016.  Steven Mark […]

Read More Texas Scrutiny of Bite Mark Evidence

A Constitutional Debate on Collecting DNA At Arrest in Georgia

Prosecutors in Georgia are pushing lawmakers to pass an initiative that would allow for the collection of DNA at individuals’ arrests, as opposed to after convictions. The prosecutors believe that this practice would be in line with Supreme Court decisions that allow for collection of DNA within the Fourth Amendment, specifically the holding in Maryland […]

Read More A Constitutional Debate on Collecting DNA At Arrest in Georgia

Kaye on the DFSC new fingerprint policy

David Kaye writes on his blog here about the U.S. Army’s Defense Forensic Science Center (DFSC) notice on a new policy for expressing associations with latent fingerprints.  This is the revised language to be used to express conclusions: “The latent print on Exhibit ## and the record finger/palm prints bearing the name XXXX have corresponding ridge detail. […]

Read More Kaye on the DFSC new fingerprint policy

Justice Department Announces New Accreditation Policies to Advance Forensic Science

“Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates announced today [in this press release] that the Justice Department will, within the next five years, require department-run forensic labs to obtain and maintain accreditation and require all department prosecutors to use accredited labs to process forensic evidence when practicable. Additionally, the department has decided to use its grant […]

Read More Justice Department Announces New Accreditation Policies to Advance Forensic Science