NIJ Journal: Fighting Crime with Science

The National Institute of Justice wrote in its most recent journal about research and developmental projects used to improve forensic science disciplines. These efforts include: studying drugs at electronic music festivals and using this information to understand how people are modifying popular drugs, as well as studying the regional use of these drugs; reconstructing fragmentary skeletal […]

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Massachusetts judge overturns 24-year-old rape conviction based on hair testimony that would not be admissible today

Defendant George D. Perrot has been in jail for the past 30 years, serving two concurrent life sentences for a rape. Both Perrot and the victim of the crime have repeatedly asserted that Perrot was not the man who committed the crime. A Massachusetts judge overturned the conviction in a 79-page decision describing a defendant […]

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Williams v. U.S. Opinion

The concurring opinion in Williams v. U.S., 2016— A.3d —-2016 WL 275301 (D.C. Ct. App. Jan. 21, 2016) is now available.  Below are excerpts: EASTERLY, Associate Judge, concurring: In our adversarial system, we do not expect trial courts to “recognize on [their] own” that an expert’s testimony is “scientifically unorthodox or controversial.” (John ) Jones v. […]

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D.C. Court of Appeals Opinion on “Alarming” Presentation of Ballistics

Despite a 2009 policy barring such “absolute” conclusions about ballistics, in the Marlon Williams trial in 2010, a D.C. police analyst testified: “Those markings are unique to that gun and that gun only,” and that gun “fired these three bullets.”  Spenser Hsu of the Washington Post reports that D.C. Court of Appeals judge Catherine Easterly wrote a […]

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